Christian festival in Egypt makes a joyful noise

The Egyptian desert was abuzz for three days with thousands of young people. Sounds of cheering, worship, singing, playing, and laughing filled Beit El Wadi (House of the Valley) of the Evangelical Church in Egypt in celebration of the annual Count it Right Festival.

As a partner of Kasr El Dobara Evangelical Church, which organised the festival, SAT-7 got the opportunity to be present on the ground, speak with the youth, and showcase all the activities and events.

SAT-7 ARABIC sent a large team to cover the event live on television and social media for three days. They set up a booth where young people could learn more about the channel and watch films, and also raised awareness of environmental issues, which form one part of SAT-7’s Youth for an Enabling Society project in Egypt.[1]

Transformed lives

SAT-7 viewers followed the live broadcast and interacted with the Viewer Support team, who received their prayer requests, prayed with them, and encouraged them. Eleven people who got in touch became believers, and the team are continuing to disciple them. Remarkable testimonies of answered prayers for healing or release from prison were received.

Many viewers also sent in stories of change after attending the festival or watching it on SAT-7.

“We spent the best hours and days there at the festival. May the Lord bless it and use it for the glory of His name,” wrote one viewer.

“I came out of the festival a different person. Thank you so much for being the reason for the change in me,” said another.

A third viewer wrote, “I am so proud of our Lord for allowing this inside our country and filling our generation with such passion.”

One of the children who attended said that he enjoyed the games and prayers and took a Bible home with him.

A varied program

Held annually in early October, the Count it Right Festival engages youth in imaginative ways. It was founded sixteen years ago by Andrew Palau in cooperation with the Evangelical Church in Egypt, and he says that it allows youth to meet Christ through unconventional means.

“The message of the gospel is the same. It cannot be changed or modernised, but the methods with which we bring the message are flexible, as long as they are reasonable and honour God,” he said.

The festival had twenty-one stations that included sermons, interactive activities, a cinema, arts, drama sports, lectures for youth and women, and group discussions.

Youth come from all over the country to attend meetings, watch world-champion athletes perform physical feats, and engage in art and social activities.

This year the guests included Peter Nestler, the “Rope Master” and eleven-time Guinness world record holder in rope jumping, basketball champion Bruce Crevier, and Ashutosh Chopra from Team Xtreme.

“Through my testimonies and what God has done in my life, I am able to help people see that God is able to change us regardless of what our backgrounds are,” said Peter. “I think there’s a big difference between being just a performer and allowing the Holy Spirit to work through me in what I say and do. I have been amazed and impressed at how God has been able to use my skills to really be able to connect with people and share who Jesus is.”


[1] The Youth for an Enabling Society project is implemented by SAT-7’s Cairo studio and is supported by Norad via Digni and SAT-7’s partner the Norwegian Mission Society.

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